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Marvellous Myddleton

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Published: 14/08/2017   Last Updated: 14/08/2017  
Tags: Haringey, Housing, Landlords, Tenants, News, North London

In Victorian times, Myddleton Road – tucked away behind Bowes Park Station – was a bustling terrace of shops, restaurants and homes. Thanks to the fantastic efforts of new independent traders and a strong sense of community spirit, the area is enjoying a renaissance as one of Haringey’s best-loved destinations, drawing visitors from across the borough and beyond. Local traders – such as independent bar the Step, Greek grocery Hellenic Gourmet and Italian deli La Coppia – have taken care to preserve the street’s character while making improvements, and the Myddleton Road Community gardens are a haven of calm at the centre of the area. Now a local artist has captured Myddleton’s special heritage through two beautiful 7.3 metre-long panorama artworks – using traditional techniques to capture the street for future generations. Gabriela Schutz’s ‘A Walk in Myddleton Road’ – on display at Bruce Castle Museum until late October – is an installation of two drawing panoramas that record Myddleton Road and a third drawing of the New River, which flows openly near the street. The panoramic format was popular in the 19th century, when people would go to see huge immersive panoramas of landscapes and historical events in a kind of early version of 3D cinema. Gabriela said: “The panoramas of Myddleton Road represent many walks in the road. Hopefully they will serve as an historical document of the street as it was in 2016/17. “Drawing the street, rather than viewing via Google Earth or Streetview, is about slowing down and looking properly at things – and that is true for myself, the artist, and for the viewer. “These days we spend so much time on our phones, exchanging information and communicating with distant people – yet at the same time being by ourselves. It is the personal and physical connection with a place which is the heart of this project. It is about being part of a local community and engaging with reality. “Drawing is a way of observing the world and being totally present. I have been intrigued by the changing architectural styles along the street, by the shop fronts representing different periods of time, diverse cultures and distinct aesthetic tastes.” 
www.haringey.gov.uk/brucecastle www.gabrielaschutz.com